Snow Leopard Cheat-sheet

August 31, 2009

SnowLeopardLast Friday, Apple released OS X 10.6, “Snow Leopard” to the general public. There’s been quite a bit of excitement building around it’s release, although unlike the media & PR hype surrounding the release of Leopard, this time around the buzz seems a little more organic, building more through blogs, consultants, techs, & users instead of corporate PR departments.

While I haven’t yet done extensive testing of Snow Leopard’s newest features & enhancements (I spent the days following it’s release in the mountains of Garibaldi Provincial Park), I did make some time to put together a quick ‘cheat-sheet’ of key features, enhancements, & system requirements for the new OS. Be sure to stay-tuned, however. There’s sure to be more Snow Leopard posts to follow…

Snow Leopard Cheat-Sheet

$35 Upgrades!!!:

Thats correct. Apple is offering a $35 (US$30) upgrade disc for users who have OS 10.5 (Leopard). What Apple has not announced is that this upgrade disc will also upgrade your OS X 10.4 (Tiger) systems as well!  Thank you Apple for the cheapest OS upgrade in history…

Snow Leopard System Requirements:

  • Intel processor with 1GB of memory
  • 5GB of free hard drive space
  • DVD drive (for installation)

Key Features:

  • Speed – the first thing everyone is noticing is how much of a performance boost Snow Leopard is over pervious versions of the OS
  • Mail – support for Microsoft Exchange!!!
  • Cisco VPN support – Finally!!!
  • Ejecting volumes – no more “unable to unmount <NAME> because the disk is in use” errors
  • Customizable spotlight searching
  • Automatic print driver updates – boring but practical!
  • HFS+ read support for Boot Camp – access your OS X files while booted to Windows
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iPhone SMS Security Patch

August 10, 2009

iphone_homeThe iPhone OS 3.0.1 that was released on July 31 patched a security flaw that could have allowed hackers to remotely control iPhones by launching a text-message attack. Security researchers publicized the exploit at the Black Hat cybersecurity conference and Apple posted the security patch the following day.

While Apple moved quickly, Chris Miller, one of the researchers who publicized the exploit noted that he notified Apple about the flaw nearly a month earlier and that it was first discovered in OS 2.0. It may have taken a public exposure to jump start the release.

Read more about the SMS exploit at Wired.com.

iphone_homeOn of my personal favorite features in version 3.0 of the iPhone OS is the internet tethering. My internet recently went down & it was a day or two before a tech was out to fix it (that’s service, isn’t it?). With several deadlines looming, tethering my laptop to my phone meant not having to spend two days working out of a coffee shop. Unfortunately, the deadlines also meant that I didn’t think to check Rogers’ policy (& pricing!) on tethering beforehand.

Turns out it’s not so bad. From the iPhone Smartphone Plans page on the Rogers website:

Tethering Policy
Tethering is the use of your phone as a wireless modem to connect to the Internet from your computer. For a limited time, if you subscribe to a data plan which includes at least 1GB of data transmission between June 8, 2009 and December 31, 2009, and if you have a compatible device, you may use tethering as part of the volume of data included in your plan at no additional charge. Tethering cannot be used with data plans of less than 1 GB.

For the time being, at least, data is data as far as Rogers is concerned. What will happen as of January 1st, 2010 is anyone’s guess, but for now as long as you have subscribed to a data plan of 1GB or more, there are no additional charges for data transfers using tethering.

X1Zero also wrote an excellent article for iPhone in Canada on the tethering policy for Rogers & Fido.

Follow this link for Apple’s System requirements for internet tethering.

Happy tethering!